Month: May 2017

Think Health Care, Not Just Taxes and Weather, When Deciding Where to Retire

Think Health Care, Not Just Taxes and Weather, When Deciding Where to Retire // Best states to retire to, states with best health care, best states for retirement health care, best states for health insurance

The world is full of rankings telling us where the best places are to retire, but they tend to focus a lot on state tax rates and weather, even though surveys say that people care less about taxes and weather than other factors like overall cost of living and health care quality. This post explores the health care quality factors we should all be weighting more heavily in deciding where to live in retirement, including some factors that none of the rankings take into account.

Minimizing Early Withdrawals in Early Retirement // Hang On to As Much As You Can for Later

Avoid early withdrawals in early retirement // Roth conversion ladders, IRS rule 72t Substantially Equal Periodic Payments SEPP, early retirement savings

Some possible fighting words today, as we delve into the question of whether it makes sense to think of both taxable funds and tax-advantaged retirement funds as one big pool of money. Why does it matter? Because there are a bunch of potentially huge downsides to withdrawing traditional retirement funds early through Roth conversions or rule 72t distributions (or different approaches that exist in other countries). Fortunately, there’s another great option if you’re willing to do a little more math.

The No-Income Work Experiment // Testing Our Commitment to the Principle

Not earning money for work in retirement, volunteering in retirement, work in retirement

One of the bedrock principles of our early retirement vision is that we don’t ever want to *have* to work, and we want to choose which projects to take on regardless of whether they pay. Which is all nice in theory, but does that principle stand up in the real world? With this blog as our guinea pig, we put our ideals to the test. Here’s what we learned.

The Case for Conservative Early Retirement Investment Projections

Investment Returns, Conservative Projections, Low Growth, Early Retirement, Retirement Planning

We’re all getting conflicting signals right now: From financial analysts predicting lousy returns for the foreseeable future, and from early retirees reporting how they’re beating their projections every quarter. We could take away two very different lessons from this dissonance: that we need to make sure our plan is extra solid and based on low projected returns, or that we’re probably overthinking it all and working longer than we need to. We have an opinion on this (always do!), and share why we’re taking the more conservative approach, because: recency bias.