Why We Aren’t Banking on Social Security for Our Retirement — But Why You Might

Today we're continuing the mini-series on Social Security and Medicare by looking at whether or not you should build Social Security into your retirement plan. We're not counting on it, in part because we don't need to, but also for some big reasons that are worth considering for everyone who wants a secure financial future. Give it a read and then let us know what you think!

The Income Streams Our Early Retirement Is (Now) Built On

When we first formulated a real early retirement plan, it was based on the rigid belief that we'd never, ever work again. Or at least never *have* to work again. And while that's still true -- we haven't expedited our plan by forcing ourselves to earn income in the future -- we now expect to get a much more diversified set of income streams in early retirement. In part because life happens and we've made some different choices along the way. And in part because that recession hasn't hit yet, health care is still up in the air, and it makes sense to keep hedging against sequence risk and health insurance uncertainty.

Calculating Our "Enough" -- Determining the Numbers Behind Our Financial Independence and Early Retirement Plan

How We Calculated Our “Enough” Number for Early Retirement

Today I'm (finally) sharing something that I've wanted to write about for a long time, but haven't tackled because there is no easy formula: how to determine what is "enough" to save for early retirement. "Enough" is perhaps the centrally important concept to early retirement, but it can feel overwhelming to quantify your own. Here's a breakdown on how we calculated ours, and how you can do the same for your own circumstances.

OurNextLife.com // The Power of a Low Income in Early Retirement // Keeping Your Income Low to Maximize Health Insurance, Affordable Care Act and Income, Obamacare for Early Retirees

The Power of a Low Income in Early Retirement

Today, a post about the under-recognized benefits of spending less in early retirement, because spending less means earning less, and earning less means a whole bunch of benefits. (Psst: the biggest one is insulation from Obamacare price hikes.) Let's take a deep dive into the many benefits that come with earning a low income in your early retirement years.

OurNextLife.com // Early Retirement and Financial Independence Blog | Working in Early Retirement | Portfolio Preservation | Increasing the Odds of Early Retirement Success

Rethinking Work in Early Retirement // Contingencies, Sequence Risk and Fail Safes

We have said from our second post ever that our vision for early retirement has never included mandatory work. And we've been more vigilant about this fact than probably any other in our early retirement plan. We've shifted our investments, we've changed our timelines, we've debated when to give notice, but we've never wavered on the no mandatory work idea. But... that might be changing.

OurNextLife.com // Optimizing Our Early Retirement Income // Taxes and ACA vs Actual Cashflow

Optimizing Our Retirement Income // ACA and Taxes Vs Actual Cashflow

There's an issue that we've struggled to get our heads around, which we'll call our optimal retirement income: a level at which we get a big Obamacare/ACA subsidy on our health insurance, we pay low taxes and we enjoy a comfortable standard of living. But calculating that number is not as straightforward as it seems. Enter the income vs. cashflow discrepancy!